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California wage law for Cleaners, Custodians, Maids, housekeepers and Janitors - the ultimate guide to getting the unpaid wages and penalties owed to you

California wage law for cleaners ,janitors, custodians, housekeepers and maids

If you’re a cleaner, janitor, maid and/or custodian in California, I don’t have to tell you that you work hard to make a living. Cleaning buildings, offices, hotels, schools  and the like is hard work. It’s even more difficult when you’re not getting all the wages that you’re entitled to under California wage laws for cleaners, janitors, maids and/or custodians.
 
In this article, our California wage lawyers explain wage laws for California cleaners, janitors, custodians and maids. I provide many real-world examples and case studies in order to help you understand California wage law. 
 

Get YOUR money wages that you’re owed from the company

You need to make sure that you get all of the wages that you’re entitled to under California’s worker friendly wage laws.
 
 
 
Getting your settlement check - California wage law for cleaners ,janitors, custodians and maids
 
Getting your settlement check in a wage class action case - YES!!!
 

You’re going to have to TAKE BACK the money wages that you’re owed

The company isn’t going to voluntarily give you back the money wages that they took from you. Not a chance.
 
This article is all about helping you get your hard earned wages back from the company.
 
Take YOUR money back from the company and put it where it belongs. In your pocket.
 
This is an eye-opening article that explains California wage and hour law for the hard-working folks in California that clean up the messes made by everyone else: the maids, the janitors, the cleaners and custodians.
 
If you’re a cleaner, janitor, custodian, housekeeper and/or maid in California - then I suggest you pull up a seat and stay awhile.
 

In this article our California wage lawyers answer these questions and address the following issues:

Janitors and cleaners occupations
 
Maids and housekeepers occupations
 
Why do I say, “The California Supreme Court gets it?”
 
Don’t believe me? (I understand)
 
California wage law is on your side
 
California wage laws - California Labor Code and California Wage Orders
 
What Wage Order covers maids, janitors, cleaners and custodians in California? .... Wage Order 5 - Public Housekeeping Industry
 
The company must pay you for all hours that you work
 
You must be paid for all time that you’re under the control of the company
 
“But it’s not worth it - because it’s only 2 minutes a day that I’m not getting paid for” - why thinking like this will cost you A LOT OF MONEY!!
 
Let me give you a quick example - Juan the janitor isn’t paid 2 minutes a day while he walks through the factory to the time clock
 
Don’t forget liquidated damages
 
Juan, the janitor,  also gets paycheck stub penalties
 
Juan is also entitled to waiting time penalties
 
Juan is owed $6,381 
 
Meal breaks - What is California lunch break law for custodians, maids, cleaners and janitors?
 
What's in it for me?  ... an hour's pay for every missed meal break and you must be paid for the 1/2 hour's pay that was deducted.. it can be thousands of dollars in unpaid wages
 
What does this really mean? 
 
What can company do (and cannot do) during my meal break?  
 
Rest breaks - What is California rest break law for janitors, custodians, maids, and cleaners?
 
Three quick examples of how cleaning companies, janitorial companies, maid services and custodial companies break California’s rest break laws
 
Custodians, maids, cleaners and janitors having to wear a pager, answer a radio or answer a cell phone
 
Maids that have to carry a radio
 
Janitors that have to answer their cell phones 
 
Hospital cleaners that are given pagers
 
You have to be relieved of all duties during meal breaks and rest breaks
 
Split shifts - What is California split shift law for custodians, janitors, maids and cleaners?
 
You have to be reimbursed for business expenses
 
Is it legal when the company makes me bring cleaning supplies? 
 
Is is legal when the company makes me supply cleaning equipment?
 
A case study:  the company that pays maids a percentage of what the customer pays
 
Pay stub violations for maids, cleaners, janitors and custodians
 
How much money am I owed for pay stubs that don't have the required information?
 
What are waiting time penalties?

In case you missed that - if you’re not paid all of your of your wages timely at time of termination - you’re owed 30 days pay

 

Why is Bill Turley asked to testify concerning wage law legislation at the California State Senate and the California Assembly?

Bill Turley testifies - California wage law for cleaners ,janitors, custodians and maids

Because he's known as a No B.S. straight-shooter lawyer

 
Believe it or not, Bill is known for being a no B.S. straight-up lawyer. Besides being known as one of the leading experts on this area of the law in California, one of the reasons why Bill is asked to testify at legislature hearings is because he is known for being straight-forward and blunt. He is known for being no B.S., with no lawyer-talk, no double-talk.
 

Janitors and cleaners occupations

 
According to the United States Department of Labor - Bureau of Labor Statistics Janitors and Cleaners, "Keep buildings in clean and orderly condition. Perform heavy cleaning duties, such as cleaning floors, shampooing rugs, washing walls and glass, and removing rubbish." The industry profile for these occupations include services to buildings and dwellings, schools, real estate, colleges and universities, hospital and warehouses.
 
In California, there are 230,750 persons in these occupations. In many industries, these workers are called custodians. 
 

Maids and housekeepers occupations

 
The focus here is industrial maids or maids that work for medium to larger maid services companies. According to the United States Department of Labor - Bureau of Labor Statistics Maids and Housekeepers, "Perform any combination of light cleaning duties to maintain private households or commercial establishments, such as hotels and hospitals, in a clean and orderly manner. Duties may include making beds, replenishing linens, cleaning rooms and halls, and vacuuming." The industry profile for these occupations include travelers accommodations (hotels and motels), buildings and dwellings, medical, hospitals, nursing homes, and assisted living facilities. 
 
In California, there are 98,720 persons in these occupations.
 
 


Why do I say, “The California Supreme Court gets it?”

The California Supreme Court “gets it.” They know how tough it is to make a living. My take is that many of them - are like me and you. They had parents that struggled to pay the bills and give their children a better life.
 
I have said this time and again. And it’s not just because the California Supreme Court has ruled for workers in the cases that I have been involved with. They just get it.
 

Don’t believe me?

I understand.
 
You should check out this language in the Troester case where the California Supreme Court ruled that workers have to be paid for all time that they work. Even when the company isn’t paying them for 2 minutes a day:
 
 ... a few  extra minutes of work each day can add up.... Troester is seeking payment for 12 hours and 50 minutes of compensable work over a 17-month period, which amounts to  $102.67 at a wage of $ 8 per hour. That is enough to pay a utility bill, buy a week of groceries, or cover a month of bus fares. What Starbucks calls “de minimis” is not de minimis at all to many ordinary people who work for hourly wages.
Troester v. Starbucks Corp. (2018) 5 Cal.5th 829, 847.
 

California wage law is on your side

What I’m trying to tell you is that California wage law is on your side.
 
Putting aside the all the great substantive law protecting California workers that has came out of the landmark California Supreme Court case - Brinker vs. Superior Court, the Brinker case is fundamentally about enforcing California’s strong worker protection laws.
 
One of the strong worker protection concepts in the Brinker decision is:

 In light of the remedial nature of the legislative enactments authorizing the regulation of wages, hours and working conditions for the protection and benefit of employees, the statutory provisions are to be liberally construed with an eye to promoting such protection.
Brinker Restaurant Corp. v. Superior Court (2012) 53 Cal.4th 1004, 1026-1027.

 This means that California’s Wage Orders and Labor Code are to be interpreted liberally in order to protect workers.
 
I know the Brinker case very well, because I represented the workers in the historic Brinker Supreme Court case.
 

California wage laws - California Labor Code and California Wage Orders

California wage laws come from two places - the California Labor Code and the California Wage Orders. Which Wage Order you’re covered under is very important to understanding to what your rights are under California wage laws.

What Wage Order covers maids, janitors, cleaners and custodians in California? .... Wage Order 5 - Public Housekeeping Industry


Wage Order 5 - for the “Public Housekeeping Industry” covers janitorial services and the cleaning of facilities, grounds, and commercial units.
 
If you’re a maid, janitor, custodian and/or cleaner in California then you’re probably covered by Wage Order 5 Public Housekeeping Industry.
 
Wage Order 5 sets the standards for your wages, hours and working conditions. In this article I am going to cover these and more.
 

The company must pay you for all hours that you work

Under California law, you must be paid for all hours worked. Including all time that you are under the control of your employer. Under California law, you don’t have to be actually “working” in order for the company to have to pay you.
 
For example, if the company tells you that you have to clean a building and that you are to start work at 8 p.m. and the supervisor is late and doesn’t arrive until 8:15 p.m., then you have to be paid for the waiting time. Even if you aren’t actually “working.”
 
Here is another example, if you have to travel between different jobs in the same day, the employer must pay for this travel time and reimburse for travel expenses.
 

You must be paid for all time that you’re under the control of the company

Under California law, you must be paid for all time that you’re under the control of the company.  Under California law, compensable time is "the time during which an employee is subject to the control of an employer, and includes all the time the employee is suffered or permitted to work,  whether or not required to do so." Morillion v. Royal Packaging Co., 22 Cal. 4th 575, 578 (2000).
 
For example, suppose that you clean a large warehouse. When you enter the warehouse it takes 2-3 minutes to walk from the entranceway in order to get to the time clock. Under California law, you must be paid for this 2-3 minutes walk time, since you’re under the control of the company while you’re walking to the time clock. The same is true of office buildings, schools, stadiums, and the like.
 

“But it’s not worth it - because it’s only 2 minutes a day that I’m not getting paid for” - why thinking like this will cost you A LOT OF MONEY!!

I have heard some people say, “it’s just not worth it to bring a wage case over 2 minutes a day in unpaid wages.”  While I understand why some folks may say this, it’s only because they don’t understand how powerful California wage laws are.

A quick example - Juan, a janitor,  isn’t paid 2 minutes a day while he walks through the factory to the time clock

Juan is a janitor at a factory in the Inland Empire part of California. He is paid $14 an hour.  The factory has a security gate and it takes Juan 2 minutes to get from the entranceway past the security to the time clocks each shift.  Let’s go over the wages and penalties owed to Juan, just for this 2 minutes a day. The company pays weekly. Juan works at the factory for 4 months, before he gets laid off.
 
86 days x 2 minutes = 173 minutes
 
173 minutes = 2.8 hours
 
2.8 hours x $14 = $40.44
 
This doesn't sound like much. Not so fast, I suggest. 

Don’t forget liquidated damages

Under California law, Juan is owed liquidated damages for not being paid minimum wage.  This is double the minimum wage.
 
Assuming the minimum wage is $12, the calculation is as follows:
 
 2.8 hours x $24 = $67.20
 
This still doesn't sound like much. Still, not so fast. I suggest you keep reading. 

Juan, the janitor,  also gets paycheck stub penalties

Juan is also entitled to pay stub penalties because all of the hours he worked and all of the wages he earned are not on his pay stub. Under California law, the first pay stub violation is $50 and all subsequent pay stub violations are $100. California Labor Code Section 226.
 
Thus, Jan is owed $1,750 in pay stub violations.
 

Juan is also entitled to waiting time penalties

Since the company didn't pay Juan all of the wages owed to him at time of termination (either $40.44 or $67.20, see above), Juan is owed waiting time penalties. 
 
8 hours x $112
 
$112 x 30 days = $3,360
 
 
Juan is owed for lunch break violations 
 
But wait, there’s more - lunch break violations for Juan.
 
If this isn’t enough, then you should know that Juan is also entitled to an hour’s pay each day. Because the company gives Juan a 30 minute meal break each day. 
Juan is actually getting a 26 minute meal break - not the 30 minutes required by law. This is because two minutes each lunch break is spent walking back and forth from the entrance way.   
 
Thus, the company owes Juan an hour’s pay for every missed meal break. California Labor Code Section 226.7. If we use just one meal break violation for each day - the calculation is as follows: 
 
86 x  $14 =  $1,240
 
Juan is owed $1,240 in meal period premium wages. 
 
Juan is owed $6,381 

Juan is owed $6,381 in unpaid wages and penalties.

All for not getting paid 2 minutes each day.  This is the powerfulness of California wage laws.

Meal breaks - What is California lunch break law for custodians, maids, cleaners and janitors?

“An employer's duty with respect to meal breaks … is an obligation to provide a meal period to its employees. The employer satisfies this obligation if:
 
 1.  It relieves you of all duty,
 2.  Relinquishes control over your activities and
 3.  Permits you a reasonable opportunity to take an uninterrupted 30-minute break, and
 4.  Your employer does not impede or discourage you from doing so.
 Brinker vs. Superior Court  (2012) 53 Cal.4th 1004, 1040.

 
 
This is all based upon the ground-breaking California Supreme Court case - Brinker vs. Superior Court. I know the Brinker case very well, because I represented the workers in the Brinker case. I use the Brinker case all of the time in order to win workers wages in unpaid wages class action cases.


What's in it for me?  ... an hour's pay for every missed meal break and you must be paid for the 1/2 hour's pay that was deducted.. it can be thousands of dollars in unpaid wages

You might be thinking to yourself, "How does this affect me?" ...in other words, "What's in it for me?" Good question
 
Putting aside the human side of it - that is taking a break from work and eating and relaxing, California law says that you are entitled to an hour's pay every time that your employer doesn't provide you with a legally compliant meal break.

What does this really mean?      

If you have any duties whatsoever during your meal break - then you didn’t get a meal break. A 30 minute uninterrupted meal break is exactly what it sounds like it is. But even more.
 
So, let’s explore this further.
 
You aren’t getting a 30 minute uninterrupted meal break if 1-2 minutes of it is getting in and out of the building where you work.
 
You aren’t getting a duty-free meal break if you have to keep your radio, pager or phone on during a meal break.
 
You aren't getting a duty free meal break if part of your meal break is spent waiting in a security line.
 
These are just a few of the ways that workers don't get legally compliant meal breaks under California law.
 

What the company can do (and cannot do) during my meal break

Your employer cannot demand that you respond to cell phone calls, texts, questions from coworkers or clients, or be available to the business in any way.
 
Your employer must completely relieve you of all work duties and ensure that you are free to leave the work premises if you wish.
 
If your employer fails to you provide a meal period, you are entitled to one hour's wages at your regular rate of pay for each day that a meal period was not provided.
 
If your employer requires you to remain at the job site during breaks, but still requires you to clock out, you are entitled to payment at your regular rate of pay for the meal period plus the premium of one hour's pay.
 
These are only a few examples.  
 

Is Auto-Deduct illegal in California?

Many employers have an automatic deduction for meal periods. It is essentially a policy whereby thirty minutes are automatically deducted from the employees' paychecks based on the assumption that they take half-hour meal breaks.
 
We have seen this a lot with janitors and custodians and the like.
 
Automatically deducting a meal break is illegal under California law. The employer must document when you took each meal break. Wage Order 5 Section 7(A)(3).
 
When your employer doesn’t document your meal breaks, the law presumes that you didn’t get a meal break.
 

Rest breaks - What is California rest break law for janitors, custodians, maids, and cleaners?

Under California wage law, rest periods must be provided pursuant to the California Wage Orders. Wage Order 5 requires housekeeping industry employers to provide rest periods.
 
The California Supreme Court held in the Augustus case that employers have the following duties to provide rest breaks:

 1.  Relieves its employees of all duty,
 2.  Relinquishes control over their activities and
 3.  Permits them a reasonable opportunity to take an uninterrupted 10 minute break, and
 4.  Does not impede or discourage them from doing so.  Or provide an incentive to forego.
 Augustus v. ABM Security Services, Inc., 2 Cal. 5th 257, 265, (2016).
 
 
If this sounds like it's the same duties as an employer is required to provide a meal break, it's because it is. But, in addition, the employer must also follow the requirements for rest breaks laid out in Wage Order 5. 
 
I know the Augustus case well, because I wrote the winning California Supreme Court brief in the Augustus case.

Three quick examples of how cleaning companies, janitorial companies, maid services and custodial companies break California’s rest break laws

First, if the company doesn’t provide you a place to take your rest break (this is often the case for maids, janitors, custodians, cleaners and the like) - then you didn’t get a rest break. Your break must be at a suitable resting facility.” Wage Order 5 Section 13(B).
 
Second, if you have to keep you pager, cell phone and/or radio on during your rest break - then you didn’t get a legal rest break.   Augustus v. ABM Security Services, Inc., 2 Cal. 5th 257, 265, (2016).
 
Third, you must get a “net 10 minutes” at a suitable resting facility. Wage Order 5 Section 12(A). Part of your 10 minutes can’t be taken by you walking to the break room.
 
In all three of these examples, you’re owed an hour’s pay for every day that you work because you weren't provided a legal rest break. 
 
This can really add up fast. We’re usually talking about thousands and thousands of dollars. 
 

Custodians, maids, cleaners and janitors having to wear a pager, answer a radio or answer a cell phone

We have seen many cases where janitors, maids, cleaners and custodians have to have pagers, cell phones, radios and the like.  It seems to be because these workers are sometimes not easy to find and communicate with. And the company wants to stay in communication with the workers.
 

Maids that have to carry a radio

We recently won a big settlement for hotel room cleaners (the hotel called these workers maids); that had to carry a radio with them at all times. If a room needed to be cleaned quickly or a guest had a problem, the manager got in touch with them immediately.  The maids had to have the radio with them from the time that they started their shift in the morning, until the time that they clocked out.
 
This is a violation of California meal break laws, rest break laws and the company has to pay the maids for the 30 minutes deducted for meal periods.
 

Janitors that have to answer their cell phones 

In another big case, the janitors clean large office buildings and they are told that it is important for management to be able to reach them at all times. The company tells workers that they have to have their personal cell phones for the entire work shift. From the time that they start their shift late at night, until they end, early the following morning.
 
This is a violation of California meal break laws, rest break laws and the company has to pay the maids for the 30 minutes deducted for meal periods.
 

Hospital cleaners that are given pagers

In another case, the cleaning persons work for a HUGE cleaning company. They work at a hospital here in California. They have to keep a pager with them at all times.
 
From the time they first clock in until they clock out at the end of the day, they keep the pagers on at all times.
 
This is a violation of California meal break laws, rest break laws and the company has to pay the maids for the 30 minutes deducted for meal periods.
 

You have to be relieved of all duties during meal breaks and rest breaks

In all three of these cases, the company imposes a duty on the workers to keep on their pager, radio and/or cell phone. This means under California law they didn’t get legal rest breaks and meal breaks.

Split shifts - What is California split shift law for custodians, janitors, maids and cleaners?

When you work a split shift, your employer has to pay you an hour’s pay. Wage Order 5-2001(4)(c).  For purposes of this requirement, "split shift" is defined to mean "a work schedule which is interrupted by non-paid non-working periods established by the employer, other than bona fide rest or meal periods." Wage Order 5-2001(2)(R). Although the Wage Order does not define "bona fide meal period," the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE) has historically taken the position that a bona fide meal period "is one that does not exceed one hour (60 minutes) in length."
 
For example, if you’re a hotel maid and the employer has you come in early to clean rooms and your shift ends at noon. And you are scheduled to be back to work at 2 p.m.  This is a split shift and you are owed an hour’s pay - at the minimum wage rate because you had to work a split shift. This is called a split shift premium. 
 

You have to be reimbursed for business expenses

California law requires employers to fully reimburse employees for expenses actually and necessarily incurred in the discharge of their duties, including automobile expenses. California Labor Code Section 2802; Gattuso v. Harte-Hanks Shoppers, Inc. (2007) 42 Cal.4th 554, 569. This right to reimbursement cannot be waived.  Gattuso v. Harte-Hanks Shoppers, Inc. (2007) 42 Cal.4th 554, 561.
 
Is it legal when the company makes me bring cleaning supplies? 
 
I have seen some companies make their employees bring their own cleaning supplies. This is never legal under California law.
 
Is is legal when the company makes me supply cleaning equipment?
 
Other companies make workers supply their own cleaning equipment. Unless the company is paying you double the California minimum wage - which I have NEVER seen for California janitorial companies, custodial companies, cleaning companies and/or maid companies. It just doesn’t happen.

A case study:  the company that pays maids a percentage of what the customer pays

In one case, the employer had a pay scheme where they paid maids a percentage of what the customer paid. The pay scheme was illegal because it did not pay for all hours worked (such as travel time). Thus, there was a failure to pay minimum wage, liquidated damages and overtime.
 
Further, the employer did not provide the maids meal breaks. Instead, the maids were expected to eat when they were traveling between customer locations. And the employer did not provide rest breaks.
 
Thus, there were also pay stub violations - for not putting all hours worked and wages earned on the pay stubs. And waiting time penalties.
 
Finally, the maids were owed business expenses for traveling between customer locations and having to use their own cell phones.
 

Pay stub violations for maids, cleaners, janitors and custodians

California has very stringent paycheck stub laws. There is very good reason behind these laws.  California’s pay stub laws are intended to help workers figure out whether you are being paid all the wages that you are owed.
 
California paycheck laws are intended to help you uncover wage theft. Analyzing your pay stubs is essential to figuring out that the company is stealing your wages.
 
Under California wage and hour laws, your employer has to place specific information on your pay stub/ wage statement. In essence, the pay stub has to inform you - the employee - concerning how you are being paid. You have to be able to look at the pay stub and determine how you are being paid.  This is California law. 
 
For example, if you aren’t paid for all the time that you work - it’s a pay stub violation.
 
If you aren’t paid an hour’s pay for not getting a rest break or a meal break - it’s a pay stub violation.
 
Almost all of the wage violations that I talk about in this article, result in a pay stub violation.
 

How much money am I owed for pay stubs that don't have the required information?

It’s $50 for the first violation and $100 for each additional violation - up to $4,000. You may be entitled to up to $4,000 for California paycheck stub violations.
 
In other words, it’s serious money.
 

What are waiting time penalties?

Under California's labor laws, “[i]f an employer discharges an employee, the wages earned and unpaid at the time of discharge are due and payable immediately.” California Labor Code Section 201(a).
 
If you quit and you give notice, then the employer must pay your wages on your final workday. Otherwise, the employer must pay your all your final wages within 72 hours of you quitting. California Labor Code Section 202(a).
 
An “employer” that “willfully fails to pay” in accordance with Sections 201 and 202 “any wages of an employee who is discharged or who quits” is subject to so-called waiting-time penalties of up to 30 days' wages. California Labor Code Section 203(a); McLean v. State of California, 1 Cal. 5th 615, 619 (2016).
 

In case you missed that - if you’re not paid all of your of your wages timely at time of termination - you’re owed 30 days pay

Thus, if aren’t paid $2 in wages at the time that you stop working for the company. The company owes you 30 days of wages. Yes, just for not paying $2 in wages. This is the power of California’s wage laws


Janitorial companies - successor employer liability - What happens if the company owes me wages and claims that they went out of business?

Under California law, successor companies are liable for the wages of employees of janitorial companies. California Labor Code Section 1434.  This law came about due to janitorial companies not paying wages owed to employees.  Thus California law imposes liability on “covered successor employers.”  California Labor Code Section 1420(e)(2).
 
(2) “Covered successor employer” means an employer who meets one or more of the following criteria:
 
(A) Uses substantially the same equipment, supervisors, and workforce to offer substantially the same services to substantially the same clients as a predecessor employer, unless the employer maintains the same workforce pursuant to Chapter 4.5 (commencing with Section 1060) of Part 3. In addition, an employer who has operated with a current and valid registration for at least the preceding three years shall not be considered a covered successor employer for using substantially the same equipment, supervisors, and workforce to substantially the same clients, if all of the following apply:
(i) The individuals in the workforce were not referred or supplied for employment by the predecessor employer to the successor employer.
(ii) The successor employer has not had any interest in, or connection with, the operation, ownership, management, or control of the business of the predecessor employer within the preceding three years.
 
(B) Shares in the ownership, management, control of the workforce, or interrelations of business operations with the predecessor employer.
 
(C) Is an immediate family member of any owner, partner, officer, licensee, or director of the predecessor employer or of any person who had a financial interest in the predecessor employer. “Immediate family member” means a spouse, parent, sibling, son, daughter, uncle, aunt, niece, nephew, grandparent, grandson, granddaughter, mother-in-law, father-in-law, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, or cousin.
California Labor Code Section 1420(e)(2).
 

What does this mean in plain language?

If the janitorial company you work for owes you wages and goes out of business, you may still be able to collect wages against the company or owners of the company under these laws.
 

Janitors, Maids, Housekeepers, Custodians and Cleaners  - PAGA Penalties

Under the Private Attorneys General Act you can collect penalties against the company, the company owner and/or your supervisor for violations of the California Labor Code. The PAGA penalties are in addition to wages and other penalties you may collect.
 
I know a lot about PAGA because I helped write the latest changes to California’s PAGA laws.

 

Questions or if you need help right now?


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This article isn't legal advice

 
These discussions and/or examples are not legal advice. All legal situations are different. These testimonials, endorsements, photos and/or discussions do not constitute a guarantee, warranty, or prediction regarding the outcome of your legal matter, your particular case/ situation. Every case is different. There are any number of reasons why class actions are not certified, not won and/or PAGA actions are not successful.
 
Just because we have gotten great results in so many other unpaid wage cases, doesn't guarantee in particular result in other cases. Including, your wage case. Every case is different. In other words, your mileage may vary.
William Turley
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“When I seek out professional advice, I don’t want B.S., I want it straight up. I figure you do also.”