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Employment Discrimination Based on Race or Ethnicity is Illegal Under California Law

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Lawsuits for Racial & Ethnic Discrimination in California

 
Racial discrimination in the workplace is wrong. Ethnic discrimination in the workplace is wrong. National origin discrimination in the workplace is wrong. It’s hurtful. It’s belittling. It's degrading. It’s also illegal.
 
If you have been discriminated against for these reasons in California, then you may be entitled to significant compensation. But, as I explain on this web page, it’s actually bigger than that.
 
My name is Bill Turley, I’m a California employment lawyer.
 

In this article, I answer the following questions (and much more):

 
What is racial and ethnic discrimination?

Is it a violation of federal law for an employer to discriminate because of race?

Is it against California State law for an employer to discriminate against an employee because of the employee’s race?

What are unlawful employment practices in California regarding race, color, national origin, and/or ethnicity?

Is the law the same in California for workplace racial discrimination, ethnic discrimination, national origin discrimination, and discrimination because of the color of your skin?

What is racial or ethnic workplace harassment in California?

What is a racial or ethnic hostile work environment harassment - directed at me lawsuit, under California employment law?

What will I need to prove in order to win my  racial or ethnic hostile work environment harassment - directed at me lawsuit?

What is a racial and/or ethnic hostile work environment where the illegal conduct directed at others?

What will I need to prove in order to win a hostile work environment case when the conduct was directed at others?

What if the racial or ethnic harassment is by a supervisor?
 
What if the racial or ethnic harassment is by someone other than a supervisor?

In order to win a racial or ethnic harassment case, do I have to show that the company was negligent?

Is it illegal to discriminate against me based upon the race, ethnicity and/or national origin of my spouse or family?

Is workplace racial or ethnic discrimination against me illegal if I am white or Caucasian? ....in other words, under California law, can I be discriminated against if I am white/ Caucasian?

Can I be discriminated against by someone that is the same race or ethnicity as I am?

Can I sue the company I work at for racial discrimination or ethnic discrimination in California?

Can I sue my employer for a racial hostile work environment or an ethnic hostile work environment in California?

When I bring a racial discrimination case or an ethnic discrimination case can I get an immediate right to sue notice?

What is the standard for racial harassment under Federal law?

What do I need to establish a case of disparate impact under Federal law?

What are the factors that must be considered when evaluating a racially hostile work environment under?

From what perspective is the racially hostile work-place viewed from?

Does the definition of “harassment” includes verbal harassment such as epithets, derogatory comments, or slurs?

Can racial harassment by non-employees give rise to a hostile work environment under California law?

Avis racial discrimination case study

What is “me to” evidence under California employment law? 

Can I use “me-to” evidence in a racial discrimination, ethnic discrimination, racial hostile work environment and/or ethnic hostile work environment lawsuit in California?

Why is “me-to” evidence important in racial discrimination and ethnic discrimination lawsuits?

What money damages can I get in a racial discrimination lawsuit and/or ethnic discrimination lawsuit in California?

Can a racial discrimination lawsuit get me my job back?

What are you going to do about it?

What are the right reasons for bringing a racial discrimination lawsuit?

What if I’m not sure if I have a racial discrimination case? 

How can I find out if I have a racial discrimination case?


What is racial and ethnic discrimination?

Racial and ethnic discrimination is when someone is treated differently because of their race, color, national origin and/or their ethnic group. Racial and ethnic discrimination in the workplace is illegal under both California law and Federal law. California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) 12940 and 42 U.S.C.S. § 2000e-2(a)(1).
 
A race is a grouping of humans based on shared physical or social qualities into categories generally viewed as distinct by society.
 
Race generally refers to a person’s skin color, hair color and/or physical features. For example, black, brown, red, yellow or white. For example, Afro-American, Asian, African, Indian, American Indian, Middle Eastern, or Caucasian.
 
An ethnic group or an ethnicity, is a category of people who identify with each other based on similarities such as common ancestry, language, history, society, culture or nation. Ethnicity is usually an inherited status based on the society in which one lives. Membership of an ethnic group tends to be defined by a shared cultural heritage, ancestry, origin myth, history, homeland, language or dialect, symbolic systems such as religion, mythology and ritual, cuisine, dressing style, art or physical appearance.
 
National origin usually refers to your place of birth or ethnic heritage.
 
Workplace discrimination based upon race, color, national origin and/or someone’s ethnic group is not only illegal but is also wrong. When you are discriminated against for these reasons it hurts. 
 
Race discrimination is when you are treated unfairly because of your race, or because of the race of someone you are connected with, such as your partner. Race discrimination is fundamentally unfair. The law realizes this. When this happens to you, you need to know your legal rights.
 

Is it against federal law for an employer to discriminate because of race?

Yes. Federal law makes it unlawful for an employer "to discriminate against any individual with respect  to his compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment, because of such individual's race." Title VII 42 U.S.C. § 2000e-2(a)(1).
 

Is it against California State law for an employer to discriminate against an employee because of the employee’s race?

Yes. The California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) bars an employer from "discriminating against an employee in compensation or in terms, conditions, or privileges of employment" because of the employee's race. California Government Code Section 12940(a).
 

What are unlawful employment practices in California regarding race, color, national origin, and/or ethnicity?

Under the FEHA it is illegal (read: an unlawful employment practice) for an employer to discriminate against you because of your race, color, national origin, and/or ethnicity. These unlawful employment practices can relate to any aspect of your employment, including, but not limited to the following illegal employment practices:
 - Refusing to hire you
 - Refusing to promote you
 - Promoting persons of a certain race, ethnicity and/or national origin
 - Not promoting persons of a certain race, ethnicity and/or national origin
 - Pay you less
 - Reduce your pay
 - Deny equal pay
 - Firing you/ terminating you/ discharging you
 - Force you to quit
 - Refusing to train you
 - Giving you bad or less desirable shifts
 - Showing favoritism
 - Giving others privileges
 - Giving others perks
 - Assign you different duties
 - Harass you or others
 - Making derogatory comments about you or others
 - Making racists statements
 - Racist “jokes”
 - Degrade you or others
 - Humiliate you or others
 - Make fun of you or others
 - Making fun or your or others accent
 - Failing to put a stop to racial jokes and/or ethnic jokes
 - Bullying you or other similar behavior
 - Any other form of treating you or others in the work place differently
 

Bill Turley is regularly asked to testify concerning

employment law legislation at the California State Senate

 and the California Assembly

Lawsuits for Racial & Ethnic Discrimination in California - Bill Turley California Employment Lawyer

Is the law the same in California for workplace racial discrimination, ethnic discrimination, national origin discrimination, and discrimination because of the color of your skin?

In this article, when I am referring to racial discrimination, ethnic discrimination, national origin discrimination, and/or discriminated because of the color of your skin. The law is the same for each of these type of discrimination.
 
So for brevity's sake, if I don’t spell out each of them, you should know that California law treats each of them illegally and similarly.
 

What is racial or ethnic workplace harassment in California?

Under California law, there are two different types of racial workplace harassment.
 
First, a racial or ethnic hostile work environment where the illegal conduct is directed toward you.
 
Second, is a racial or ethnic hostile work environment where the illegal conduct is directed towards others.
 
I discuss both of these types of workplace harassment in some detail in this article.
 

What is a racial or ethnic hostile work environment harassment - directed at me lawsuit, under California employment law?

The first type of racial or ethnic hostile work environment is called “hostile work environment harassment - directed at the Plaintiff.” 
 
This is what the actual California jury instruction is called. The jury instructions are called “CACI”
 
This is what the lawyers and the Judge will call this type of racial harassment in your case. So you may as well be using the proper terminology, from the start. I realize that few other lawyers or websites are going are going to be giving you this type of “insider information.” But I’m not afraid of giving this away.
 
With this type of hostile work environment case, the racially motivated and/or ethnic motivated hostilities, harassment and/or abuse is directed toward you, the person bringing the claim.
 
Under California law, you can bring a claim when your employer causes or allows a racial and/or ethnic hostile or abusive work environment.
 
California law allows you to sue your employer when a racial or ethnic hostile work environment harassment is directed at you.
 

What will I need to prove in order to win my  racial or ethnic hostile work environment harassment - directed at me lawsuit?

In order to establish this claim you will need to prove the following:
 
 1.   That you were an employee of the Defendant. (Or an unpaid intern or volunteer);
 2.  That you were subject to unwanted harassing conduct because of your race, ethnicity, color, and/or national origin.
 3.  That the harassing conduct was severe or pervasive;
 
 4.  That a reasonable person in your circumstances would have considered the work environment to be hostile or abusive;
 5.  The you considered the considered the work environment to be hostile or abusive;
 6.  That either a supervisor engaged in the conduct or the supervisors knew or should have known of the conduct and failed to take immediate and and appropriate corrective action;
 7.  That you were harmed; and
 8.  That the conduct was a substantial factor in causing your harm.
 CACI 2521a.


What is a racial and/or ethnic hostile work environment where the illegal conduct directed at others?

The second type of hostile work environment under California law is called “hostile work environment harassment - directed at others.”  Meaning, the racial and/or ethnic hostilities, harassment and/or abuse is directed toward one of your co-workers or someone else and you witnessed the harassing behavior.
 
This form of racial and/or ethnic discrimination is also illegal under California law. California law allows you to sue your employer when racial or ethnic hostile work environment harassment is directed at others

What will I need to prove in order to win a hostile work environment case when the conduct was directed at others?

Under California employment law, in order to prevail in your racial and/or ethnic hostile work environment case where the harassing conduct is directed at others (for example, your co-workers) you will have to prove the following:
 
1.  That you are a member of a protected status. For example, your race, national origin, color, and/or your ethnicity.
2.  That you are an employee, unpaid intern and/or volunteer with the company;
3.  That you, although not personally subjected to unwanted racial and/or ethnic harassing conduct, personally witnessed harassing conduct that took place in your immediate work environment;
4.  That the harassing conduct was severe or pervasive;
5.  That a reasonable in your protected group (You racial group, ethnic group, color and/or national origin) in your circumstances would have considered the work environment to be hostile or abusive;
6.  That you considered the work environment to be hostile or abusive toward [e.g., Afro-Americans, Mexicans, Hispanics, Arab people, etc.
8.  That a supervisor engaged in the conduct; or
7.  Your employer’s supervisor’s or agents knew or should have known of the conduct and failed to take immediate and appropriate corrective action;
7.  That you were  harmed; and
8.  That the racial and/or ethnic conduct was a substantial factor in causing your harm.
CACI 2521b
 

What if the racial or ethnic harassment is by a supervisor?

When racial or ethnic harassment is by a supervisor, the law says that company is strictly liable. Meaning the company is liable for the harassment on the part of supervisors and company management and you don’t have to show negligence on the part of the company. That is, that the company is deemed to know or should have known of the racial or ethnic harassment.
 

What if the racial or ethnic harassment is by someone other than a supervisor?

When the racial or ethnic harassment is by someone other than a supervisor, you are going to need to prove that the company knew or should have known of the harassment.

In order to win a racial or ethnic harassment case, do I have to show that the company was negligent?

In other words, you are going to have to show negligence on the part of the company when the racial or ethnic discrimination or hostile work environment when the acts were on the part of someone other than a supervisor. 
 

Is it illegal to discriminate against me based upon the race, ethnicity and/or national origin of my spouse or family?

Yes. California employment discrimination laws protect you when you are discriminated against due to the race ethnicity and/or national origin of your spouse or family.
 

Is workplace racial or ethnic discrimination against me illegal if I am white or Caucasian? ....in other words, under California law, can I be discriminated against if I am white/ Caucasian?

Yes. Workplace racial/ ethnic discrimination and/or a hostile work environment is illegal even if it against white employees and/or Caucasian employees.

Can I be discriminated against by someone that is the same race or ethnicity as I am?

Yes, Any racial or ethnic discrimination is illegal in California. Discrimination based upon race or ethnicity is illegal in California, even when the vitim and the abuser are of the same race or ethnic group.
 

Can I sue the company I work at for racial discrimination or ethnic discrimination in California?

Yes, under California law, racial discrimination and ethnic discrimination is illegal. You can bring a racial discrimination lawsuit in California. An employee generally has to file a complaint with the DFEH or the EEOC before you can file a racial discrimination or ethnic discrimination lawsuit in court. This requires that you get a “right to sue” notice before you can take your case to court.

Can I sue my employer for a racial hostile work environment or an ethnic hostile work environment in California?

Yes. Racial hostile work environments and ethnic hostile work environments  are illegal in California. You can bring a racial or ethnic hostile work environment lawsuit in California. An employee generally has to file a complaint with the DFEH or the EEOC before you can file a lawsuit in court. This requires that you get a “right to sue” notice before you can take your case to court.
 

When I bring a racial discrimination case or an ethnic discrimination case can I get an immediate right to sue notice?

Yes, you can request an immediate right to sue notice. When you do this, you don’t have to complete a DFEH or EEOC investigation. If you receive a Right-to-Sue notice, your complaint will not be investigated by the DFEH.
 
I suggest that you only do this when you have an attorney representing you in your racial discrimination or ethnic discrimination case.

What is the standard for racial harassment under Federal law?

It is an unlawful employment practice for an employer to discriminate against any individual with respect to his compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment, because of such individual's race. 42 U.S.C.S. § 2000e-2(a)(1).
 
It is illegal to create a hostile work environment. This violates "the right to work in an environment free from discriminatory intimidation, ridicule, and insult." Meritor Sav. Bank, FSB v. Vinson, 477 U.S. 57, 65 (1986).
 
The law recognizes that a workplace in which racial hostility is pervasive constitutes a form of discrimination." Woods v. Graphic Communications, 925 F.2d 1195, 1200 (9th Cir. 1991); McGinest v. GTE Serv. Corp. (9th Cir. 2004) 360 F.3d 1103, 1106.
 
In determining if an environment is so hostile, there is a need to look at "all the circumstances." Nichols v. Azteca Rest. Enters., 256 F.3d 864, 872 (9th Cir. 2001).
The harassment must be  "sufficiently severe or pervasive to alter the conditions of the victim's employment and create an abusive working environment." Meritor Sav. Bank, FSB v. Vinson, 477 U.S. 57, 67 (1986).
 

What do I need to establish a case of disparate impact under Federal law?

"To establish a prima facie case of disparate impact under Federal law, you must:
 
 (1) show a significant disparate impact on a protected class or group;
 (2) identify the specific employment practices or selection criteria at issue; and (3) show a causal relationship between the challenged practices or criteria and the disparate impact."
 Hemmings v. Tidyman's Inc., 285 F.3d 1174, 1190 (9th Cir. 2002).
 
"A plaintiff establishes a prima facie case of disparate impact by showing a significant disparate impact on a protected class caused by a specific, identified, employment practice or selection criterion."  In a disparate impact case, "[t]he plaintiff must actually prove the discriminatory impact at issue." Stout v. Potter, 276 F.3d 1118, 1121-1122 (9th Cir. 2002).
 

What are the factors that must be considered when evaluating a racially hostile work environment under?

In evaluating the objective hostility of a work environment, the factors to be considered under include:
 
 - the "frequency of discriminatory conduct;
 - its severity;
 - whether it is physically threatening or humiliating, or a mere offensive utterance; and
 - whether it unreasonably interferes with an employee's work performance."
Nichols v. Azteca Rest. Enters., 256 F.3d 864, 872 (9th Cir. 2001).
 
"The required level of severity or seriousness varies inversely with the pervasiveness or frequency of the conduct." Nichols v. Azteca Rest. Enters., 256 F.3d 864, 872 (9th Cir. 2001).
 

From what perspective is the racially hostile work-place viewed from?

In evaluating the significance of the statements in question, the jury must consider the objective hostility of the workplace from the perspective of the person being harassed.  Nichols v. Azteca Rest. Enters., 256 F.3d 864, 872 (9th Cir. 2001); Ellison v. Brady, 924 F.2d 872, 878-79 (9th Cir. 1991).
 
The jury must evaluate the racially hostile work-place from the perspective of a reasonable person belonging to the racial or ethnic group of the plaintiff.
Allegations of a racially hostile work-place must be assessed from the perspective of a reasonable person belonging to the racial or ethnic group of the plaintiff. McGinest v. GTE Serv. Corp. (9th Cir. 2004) 360 F.3d 1103, 1115.
 

Does the definition of “harassment” includes verbal harassment such as epithets, derogatory comments, or slurs?

Yes. California law against discrimination in employment because of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin encompasses racial harassment that is sufficiently severe or pervasive to alter the conditions of the victim’s employment and create an abusive work environment. The definition of “harassment” includes verbal harassment such as epithets, derogatory comments, or slurs. California Government Code Section 12940(h)(1)Aguilar v. Avis Rent-a-Car Sys. (Cal. App. 1st Dist. May 21, 1996), 50 Cal. App. 4th 28, 53 Cal. Rptr. 2d 599, 1996 Cal. App. LEXIS 471, review or reh'g granted, depublished, Aguilar v. Avis Rent A Car Sys. (Cal. Sept. 4, 1996), 56 Cal. Rptr. 2d 376, 921 P.2d 602, 1996 Cal. LEXIS 5077, aff'd, Aguilar v. Avis Rent A Car Sys. (Cal. Aug. 2, 1999), 21 Cal. 4th 121, 87 Cal. Rptr. 2d 132, 980 P.2d 846, 1999 Cal. LEXIS 4850.
 

Can racial harassment by non-employees give rise to a hostile work environment under California law?

The FEHA provides that neither an employer nor "any other person" may harass an employee on account of the latter's race. "Harassment of an employee . . . shall be unlawful if the entity, or its agents or supervisors, knows or should have known of this conduct and fails to take immediate and appropriate corrective action."  California Government Code Section 12940(j)(1).
 
Racial harassment by non-employees can give rise to employer liability. To bring this kind of claim you will have to show that your employer knowingly allowed non-employees to harass you because of race.
 
In one case, the court allowed a former employees' hostile work environment cause of action under California's Fair Employment and Housing Act to proceed because the employees claimed that the employer knowingly allowed non-employee clients to subject the employees to severe and pervasive racial slurs and epithets. Bonner v. Homeless Servs. Ctr., 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 2500 (Jan. 7, 2016).


Avis racial discrimination case study

Avis employed the 17 Hispanic/Latino plaintiffs as drivers at its San Francisco airport location. The Avis employees were responsible for moving automobiles between parking lots and check-in and service station areas. The Hispanic/ Latino employees sued Avis and individual managers, alleging multiple causes of action including employment discrimination in violation of FEHA.
 
According to the complaint, the company managers engaged in racially discriminatory harassment which created an abusive work environment. The basis of an abusive work environment claim was "'discriminatory intimidation, ridicule, and insult' . . . that is 'sufficiently severe or pervasive to alter the conditions of the victim's employment . . . .'"
 
The complaint alleged that the service station manager, routinely called the plaintiffs "'motherfuckers' and other derogatory names, and continually demeaned them on the basis of their race, national origin and lack of English language skills."
 
The case went to the jury. The jury found racial discrimination and awarded damages for emotional distress.  

What is “me-to” evidence under California employment law? 

“Me to” evidence is evidence of racial bias or ethnic bias against employees other than the plaintiff (read: you, the person bringing the lawsuit). California courts have held “me too” evidence admissible evidence in discrimination and harassment cases.

As with all evidence, the courts weigh the probative value of evidence vs. it’s prejudicial effect. The relevance of evidence concerning conduct toward nonparty employees is inherently “‘fact based and depends on many factors, including how closely related the evidence is to the plaintiff's circumstances and theory of the case.’” Johnson v. United Cerebral Palsy/Spastic Children's Foundation (2009) 173 Cal.App.4th 740, 767.


Can I use “me-to” evidence in a racial discrimination, ethnic discrimination, racial hostile work environment and/or ethnic hostile work environment lawsuit in California?

Yes. Under California employment law, “me to” evidence is admissible in racial and ethnic discrimination lawsuits and racial and ethnic hostile work environment lawsuits.

“Me to” may be admissible to prove a defendant's motive or intent even where the conduct occurred outside the plaintiff's presence and at times other than when the plaintiff was employed by the company. Pantoja v. Anton (2011) 198 Cal.App.4th 87, 115–116.

Why is “me-to” evidence important in racial discrimination and ethnic discrimination lawsuits?

Me-to evidence can be powerful evidence in a racial discrimination lawsuit and/or an ethnic discrimination lawsuit. Evidence that the company or supervisor was hostile, abusive or worse toward others of the same group as you, is very persuasive in convincing the jury and the court that there was hostility and/or abuse directed toward you.
 
While this may also sound like common sense, it has not always been the case. What you are going to see is that law develops over time. Oftentimes the law is behind what is happening in society.


What money damages can I get in a racial discrimination lawsuit and/or ethnic discrimination lawsuit in California?

Under California law, if you have been racially discriminated against at work or ethnically discriminated against at work you may be entitled to receive the following money damages:
 
 - Back pay
 - Interest
 -  Future pay
 - Higher income from a promotion or raise
 - Lost medical benefits and/or other benefits
 - Pension benefits
 - Bonus pay
 - emotional distress
 - punitive damages
 

Can a racial discrimination lawsuit get me my job back?

Yes. A successful racial discrimination lawsuit in California can allow equitable remedies. If you were fired based upon your race, the court can Order the company to rehire you.
 
That doesn’t mean you have to go back to work at the company if you don't want to go back. But you may be able to if you want to go back to work there. It’s the same for ethnic discrimination lawsuits.
 

Can I be fired for filing a racial discrimination, racial harassment and/or racial hostile work environment lawsuit in California?

Under California law, it is illegal to retaliate against you if you file a racial discrimination, racial harassment and/or racial hostile work environment lawsuit. This is a wrongful termination.
 
As a practical matter, when you sue a company for  racial discrimination, racial harassment and/or racial hostile work environment; you have to anticipate that they may retaliate against you. It’s illegal. But it does happen.
 
With larger companies, the company will oftentimes take a “hands-off” approach with you after you file this kind of lawsuit against them.
 
With smaller or less sophisticated companies, you can anticipate that they are going to “have it in” for you. You should know this going in.
Sometimes it is better to quit the company before you sue them or be prepared to leave the company once you sue them. It depends on the situation.
This is an area that I recommend that you talk to the best, honest employment lawyer you can find before you file an EEOC complaint and/or DEFH complaint.


What are you going to do about it?

The fact of the matter is that hostile workplaces are all too common in California. From small companies, to mid-sized companies to the largest companies in California. You may have worked in one of these companies.
 
The question you may now face is whether you are going to take the first step to hold the company accountable?  When you are forced to work in a hostile work environment you probably are incurring emotional distress. Not to mention the threat or real loss of wages.
 

California law protects you. But only if you take action.

What are the right reasons for bringing a racial discrimination lawsuit?

Racial discrimination is wrong. Ethnic discrimination is wrong. National origin discrimination is wrong. It’s hurtful. It’s belittling.  It’s degrading. Studies have shown that racial discrimination has huge mental health impacts. It’s distressing.
 
But I don’t have to tell you all of this. You’ve lived it. You know.
 
Companies or people that discriminate such as this need to pay. They deserve to have to pay. That is what the law does. When you’ve been discriminated against illegally or had to work in a hostile work environment, the law allows you to be compensated. That is fair.
 
In addition, by bringing a racial discrimination lawsuit, you are stopping these bad actors and/or companies from discriminating against other employees like yourself. You are helping everyone else in your situation and/or in the future from being discriminated against.
 
But it’s bigger than that. The law is bigger than that. Because the law also acts as an example. Racial discrimination lawsuits  tell everyone else, they tell society and  tell all other companies that discrimination is wrong. The law is a teacher in that regard. You are helping teach the community a life lesson by bringing your racial discrimination lawsuit
 
In addition, the law, in it’s great wisdom, acts as a deterrent. By bringing a lawsuit for discrimination, you are using the harm that was taken against you, to help deter other
people and other companies from discriminating in the future.
 
In that sense, the more money that is awarded to you for your having to suffer and endure discrimination in the workplace, the more deterrence is going to be provided to stop other people from behaving badly in the manner that they have behaved against you.
 
Yes, you are bringing a case in order to have justice delivered to your doorstep in the form of money compensation. But, at the same time, you are bringing a discrimination case for all of the right reasons.
 
In order for any of this to happen, you have to take action. You have to do something.
 
I suggest that you simple send a message or pick up the phone and contact the best, honest California employment lawyer that you can find.
 

What if I’m not sure if I have a racial discrimination case? 

 
There is no harm in finding out. You have a lot to gain. It doesn’t cost you a thing. There is no obligation just by seeing if you have a case to begin with. The “looking into it,” part is free.
You don’t have to bring a case if you don’t want to. But since you’ve come this far, don’t you at least owe it to yourself to see if you have a case?
 

How can I find out if I have a racial discrimination case?

You;ve come this far. If you've read this web page, you have a good grasp on California workplace discrimination law. If you want to find out if you  have a case, you can call us or leave us a message on this web page. There is no obligation and we aren't going to charge you for talking to us on the phone. Generally, we handle cases on a contingency basis. We put up the costs and you only have to pay us if we win. 
 
You can call us at 619-304-1000
 
If not us, then you should contact the best, honest California employment lawyer that you can find.
 
It’s for all the right reasons.
 

A No B.S. straight-shooter lawyer

Believe it or not, Bill Turley is known for being a no B.S. straight-up lawyer. Besides being known as one of the leading experts on employment law in California, one of the reasons why Bill is asked to testify at California legislature hearings is because he is known for being straight-forward and blunt. He is known for being no B.S., with no lawyer-talk, no double-talk.

                    

 
   

 unlawful employment practices in California regarding race, color, national origin, and/or ethnicity


        “When I seek out professional advice,

I don’t want B.S., I want it straight up.

I figure you do also.” Bill Turley

         619-304-1000 

Or leave a message on this web page

Please understand these discussions and/or examples are not legal advice. All legal situations are different. This testimonial, endorsement and/or discussion does not constitute a guarantee, warranty, or prediction regarding the outcome of your legal matter, your particular case/ situation and/or this particular case/ situation.
In other words, you're mileage may vary. Just because we have had great results in so many other California employment cases, doesn't mean we will in your case.
 
 
William Turley
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“When I seek out professional advice, I don’t want B.S., I want it straight up. I figure you do also.”
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