Go to navigation Go to content
Phone: 619-304-1000
The Turley Law Firm P.C.

Under California law should I be getting paid for all the time I work?

Comments (0)
 

What is the law in California for getting paid for all time that I work?

Under California law, employees must be paid for all time that they work. This may seem straight forward and relatively simple, at first. If you’re working, then you should be getting paid. No kidding. Right?
 
But (there’s always a “but,” it seems) - - there is so much more to this than it first might seem. I get folks calling my office everyday. They are referred by former clients .Usually they are referred by a friend or co-worker or family member got money in one of out Class action wage cases or PAGA wage cases.  
 
Almost everyday I talk to folks that aren’t getting paid for all the time that they work. Sometimes they realize that they’re not getting paid and that’s why they’re calling my office. However, many times they are calling about some other reason or why they think they’re not getting paid all of the wages that they should be getting paid.   
In many instances, folks aren’t getting paid for all of the time they work, but they don’t realize it.
 
There are some ways that companies don’t pay employees for all of the time that they work. Here are some of the ways that workers aren’t getting paid for all the time that they work:
 
Not relieving employees of all duties during meal breaks

Not relinquishing all control during meal breaks

Employees standing in security lines going into work and leaving work

Employees walking to where you punch in and not getting paid for this time

Not getting paid while you’re putting on and/or taking off uniforms, changing into safety gear and the like

Time spent booting computers before you clock in or clock out

Time spent riding in company vehicles

Time spent checking work emails/ responding to emails (and texts)

Attending meetings and such

Getting ready for work (before you punch in)

Waiting at time clocks before you punch in

Talking on the phone with your work

Opening the business before you clock in

Closing the business after you clock out (setting alarms, walking out, locking the door, etc.)

On-call time
 
Training time

Time spent waiting - for example, waiting for customers or a call from your employer

Not getting paid for shift overlap time/ wages
 
 

In this article I answer the following questions and/or address the following issues: 

We’re usually talking about thousands of dollars in wages and penalties owed (even for something as small as $20 in unpaid wages)

How can 2 minutes per shift in unpaid time adds up to thousands of dollars? 

In other words, don’t go thinking that “it’s only a couple minutes of day in unpaid time, so it’s not worth it.” 

What is "compensable time" under California law? 
 
What time must I be paid for?

Under the control of your employer - what does it mean to be under the control of my employer for California wage law? 

Not being relieved of all duties shows that you are under the control of your employer

If I'm required to stay on the employer’s premises - am I subject to the control the employer? 

Why is it that I must be paid for time what I'm required to spend at my employer's premises - even if I'm not working? 

It’s all about paying employees for all the time that they are subject to the control of the employer (how this all plays out in the real world)

You don’t have to be working - but if you’re subject to your employers control - then you have to be paid

If I'm playing video games at work - am I supposed to be getting paid for that time? ...You have to be paid for time you’re under the control of your employer - even if you’re playing video games

Does waiting time have to be paid for in California? If the employer tells you to wait - then you must be paid for that time also

For example, Limousine drivers must be paid for waiting for customers

Do I have to be paid if I am subject to the control of the company? 
 
What is the difference between "control" vs. "subject to control," under California wage law? 

Time is compensable if an employee "is suffered or permitted to work, whether or not required to do so.

Your employer must pay you for your unauthorized overtime

What does "suffered or permitted to work mean" under the California Wage Orders?

Under the Troester case - does the employer has the burden of “tracking of small amounts of regularly occurring worktime?”

Employers are responsible for paying for all time worked, even if it’s only 59 second (or less)
 
"But it's only a couple of minutes a shift - it's not worth it..." - -  NOT!!! It can be TOTALLY worth it!!!

What are liquidated damages for wages?....  You're also owed liquidated damages  

The pay that you're owed for not getting paid for opening/ closing is probably much less than penalties you're owed under California wage laws
 
You're also owed paycheck stub violations (up to $4,000)
 
You're also owed waiting time penalties
 
You're also entitled to PAGA money penalties for California Labor Code violations 
 
PAGA Wage order violations
 
How do PAGA penalties work?
 
Should I be getting paid if it take a few minutes to open the store/ business before I clock in to get paid?
 
Am I supposed to be paid for opening the business before I clock in?
 
California wage law: Preliminary duties - opening the business
 
Am I supposed to be paid for the time it takes to close the store/ business after I have clocked out? opening the business before I clock in?
 
Should I be getting paid for the time it takes to close the business after I have clocked out?
 
Am I supposed be paid for the time it takes for a shift overlap? Shift overlap law in California.
 
If I have to go through a security check or bag check at work - should I be getting paid for that time? - getting paid for all the time that you work
 
Getting paid for the time it takes for me to put on and take off my work gear (safety gear, uniform, bunny suit, Tyvek coveralls, etc.)
 

Why is Bill Turley  asked to testify concerning  wage law legislation at the California State Senate and the California Assembly?

The wage law in California for getting paid for all the time that I work - Bill Turley

Because Bill is known as a no B.S. straight-shooter lawyer

Believe it or not, Bill is known for being a no B.S. straight-up lawyer. Besides being known as one of the leading experts on this area of the law in California, one of the reasons why Bill is asked to testify at legislature hearings is because he is known for being straight-forward and blunt. He is known for being no B.S., with no lawyer-talk, no double-talk.

 

We’re usually talking about thousands of dollars in wages and penalties owed (even for something as small as $20 in unpaid wages)

Oftentimes (if not usually) the penalties for not paying wages in California adds up to thousands of dollars. Once you factor in paycheck stub violations (up to $4,000), waiting time penalties (almost $3,000 even for minimum wage workers), liquidated damages and PAGA penalties - you’ll usually see that the wages and penalties you’re owed are thousands of dollars.
 
Getting the Class Action settlement check - getting paid for all the time that you work!! 
 
Getting paid for all the time I work - and getting my Class action settlement check!!
 

How can 2 minutes per shift in unpaid time adds up to thousands of dollars?  

In a recent Troester California Supreme Court case, a worker was unpaid while they closed up the store for about two (2) minutes per shift. The California Supreme Court held that the company must pay for that 2 minutes per shift. The wages and penalties owed to the worker ended up being thousands of dollars. All based upon about 2 minutes a shift. Troester v. Starbucks Corp., 5 Cal. 5th 829, 845 (2018). I talk about the Troester case more later in this article.

In other words, don’t go thinking that “it’s only a couple minutes of day in unpaid time, so it’s not worth it.” 

That kind of thinking could (and will) cost you thousands of dollars. That’s what the company hopes you’ll be thinking. So they can keep the money they owe you in wages and penalties.
 

What is "compensable time" under California law? What time must I be paid for?

Under California wage law, “compensable” means that you must be paid for it.
 
Under California law, compensable time is "the time during which an employee is subject to the control of an employer, and includes all the time the employee is suffered or permitted to work,  whether or not required to do so." Morillion v. Royal Packaging Co., 22 Cal. 4th 575, 578 (2000) (quoting Wage Order 4 Section 2(G)).
 
As the California Supreme Court held in the recent Troester case:
 
California labor law that mandate compensation for “any” (Lab Code, § 510(a)) and “all” time worked (Wage order No. 5 Section 2(K)). The breadth of the language reflects California's vital interest in ensuring that employers fully  compensate their employees for the work they perform. Troester v. Starbucks Corp., 5 Cal. 5th 829, 854 (2018).

Under the control of your employer - what does it mean to be under the control of my employer for California wage law? 

First, time is compensable if you are "under the control" of your employer, whether or not you’re engaging in work activities, such as by being required to remain on the employer's premises or being restricted from engaging in certain personal activities.  Morillion v. Royal Packaging Co., 22 Cal. 4th 575, 578 (2000)
 
In the Morillion case, farm workers were required to ride on the company buses while going to the fields to work. The workers weren’t “working” while riding on the buses. They could sleep or read on the bus. However, the California Supreme Court held that even though the workers weren’t “working” they were still subject to the control of the company. 
 
As the California Supreme Court noted:
 
“During the bus ride plaintiffs could not drop off their children at school, stop for breakfast before work, or run other errands requiring the use of a car. Plaintiffs were foreclosed from numerous activities in which they might otherwise engage if they were permitted to travel to the fields by their own transportation.” Morillion v. Royal Packaging Co., 22 Cal. 4th 575, 586 (2000)
 
The Supreme Court went on to say:
 
Allowing plaintiffs the circumscribed activities of reading or sleeping does not affect, much less eliminate, the control Royal exercises by requiring them to travel on its buses and by prohibiting them from effectively using their travel time for their own purposes. Similarly ... listening to music and drinking coffee while working in an office setting can also be characterized as personal activities, which would not otherwise render the time working noncompensable. Morillion v. Royal Packaging Co., 22 Cal. 4th 575, 586 (2000)
 
In the Troester case, the California Supreme Court held that “hours worked” to include preliminary and postliminary (end of the shift) activities and employees must be fully compensated for all time spent in the employer’s control. Troester v. Starbucks Corp., 5 Cal. 5th 829, 845 (2018).


Not being relieved of all duties shows that you are under the control of your employer

In the landmark Brinker case the California Supreme Court laid out the duties that employers had in providing a meal break.
 
The Supreme Court held in the Brinker case that employers have the a duty to provide meal breaks. The employer satisfies its obligation to provide meal breaks if it:
 
1.  Relieves its employees of all duty,
2.  Relinquishes control over their activities and
3.  Permits them a reasonable opportunity to take an uninterrupted 30 minute break, and
4.  Does not impede or discourage them from doing so.  Or provide an incentive to forego.
Brinker Restaurant Corp. v. Superior Court, 53 Cal. 4th 1004, 1040 (Cal. 2012) 
 
Two of those duties are employees being relieved of all duty and the employer relinquishing all control. 
 
As you can see, the Supreme Court distinguished “being relieved of all duties” from “relinquishing all control.”
 
When an employer does not relieve an employee of any duty, then the employer is subjecting the employee to a form of control.
 
Stated differently, not being relieved of all duties shows that you are under the control of your employer.
 
In Troester, compensable work time (read: time which you are supposed to be paid) included the time it took to open and close the business before employees clocked in and after the employees clocked out.  While performing these duties of opening and closing the store it shows that the worker is under the control of the employer. Troester v. Starbucks Corp., 5 Cal. 5th 829, 845 (2018).
 

If you're required to stay on the employer’s premises - are you subject to the control the employer? 

When an employer directs, commands or restrains an employee from leaving the workplace … and thus prevents the employee from using the time effectively for his or her own purposes, that employee remains subject to the employer's control. According to [the definition of hours worked], that employee must be paid. Aguilar v. Assn. of Retarded Citizens, 234 Cal. App. 3d 21 (1991).  The employer must pay the employee for this time. Bono Enterprises, Inc. v. Bradshaw (1995) 32 Cal.App.4th 968, 974–975, disapproved on other grounds in Tidewater Marine Western, Inc. v. Bradshaw (1996) 14 Cal.4th 557, 573–574).
 
Bono was cited with approval in Mendiola v. CPS Security Solutions, Inc., 60 Cal. 4th 833, 840 (2015).
 
In Bono, the Court of Appeal found that employees who were required to remain on the work premises during their lunch hour had to be compensated for that time under the definition of "hours worked." Bono Enterprises, Inc. v. Bradshaw (1995)32 Cal.App.4th 968, 975. The Bono court focused solely on the "subject to the control of an employer" clause. Bono Enterprises, Inc. v. Bradshaw (1995)32 Cal.App.4th 968, 974 -975.
 
Relying on the dictionary definition of "control," it interpreted the clause to mean when an employer "directs, commands or restrains" an employee. Bono Enterprises, Inc. v. Bradshaw (1995)32 Cal.App.4th 968, 975.
 
Why is it that I must be paid for time what I'm required to spend at my employer's premises - even if I'm not working? 
 
Thus, "[w]hen an employer directs, commands or restrains an employee from leaving the workplace during his or her lunch hour and thus prevents the employee from using the time effectively for his or her own purposes, that employee remains subject to the employer's control. According to [the definition of hours worked], that employee must be paid." Bono Enterprises, Inc. v. Bradshaw (1995)32 Cal.App.4th 968, 975.
 
The Bono court, on the facts before it, did not find that the employees worked during their lunch hour, nor did it reach the issue whether the "suffered or permitted to work" language otherwise limited their right to compensation.
 
Similarly, in Aguilar, the Court of Appeal held that the time an employer required personal attendant employees to spend at its premises, even when they were allowed to sleep, should be considered "hours worked."  Aguilar v. Association for Retarded Citizens, 234 Cal. App. 3d 21, 30 (1991).
 
As in Bono, the Aguilar court found that the employees were "subject to the control of an employer" and did not consider whether or not the employees were "suffered or permitted to work." Aguilar v. Assn. of Retarded Citizens, 234 Cal. App. 3d 21, 30 (1991). Instead, the court held the employees should be compensated for the time they spent sleeping while on the employer's premises, even though they performed no work during that time. Aguilar v. Assn. of Retarded Citizens, 234 Cal. App. 3d 21 (1991); Morillion v. Royal Packing Co., 22 Cal. 4th 575, 583-584 (2000).
 
Making it all worth while - getting your check for unpaid wages - YES!!!
 
getting your class action wage check!!


It’s all about paying employees for all the time that they are subject to the control of the employer (how this all plays out in the real world)

This is how this plays out in the real world. 
 
The company is going to argue that since you’re not actually working - that they don’t have to pay you for the time. You are going to contend, that whether you are working or not isn’t the test of whether you should be paid for the time.
 
That is, if you are not relieved of all duties and if the employer doesn’t relinquish all control over you - then you must be paid for this time.
 

You don’t have to be working - but if you’re subject to your employers control - then you have to be paid

If you are an employee who is subject to your employer's control you don’t have to be working during that time to be compensated under the California Wage Orders. Bono Enterprises, Inc. v. Bradshaw (1995) 32 Cal. App. 4th 968, 974-975; Aguilar v. Association for Retarded Citizens (1991) 234 Cal. App. 3d 21, 30; Morillion v. Royal Packing Co., 22 Cal. 4th 575, 582 (2000).
 

You have to be paid for time you’re under the control of your employer - even if you’re playing video games

For example, suppose you work in an office and you’re playing video games on the company computer. You’re not “working.” But, you’re still under the control of the company. If your boss says, “Come here, I want to discuss this report.” Then you are subject to the control and you need to do what the boss says.  You still have to be paid for this time, even if you’re not “working” (you were playing a video game) as most people think of work.
 
Now, under these circumstances, the boss could fire you (read: terminated by your employer). And there may be good cause to do so, since you’re playing video games on the job. But, you still must be paid for this time, up until the time when you’re terminated.
 
 

Does waiting time have to be paid for in California? If the employer tells you to wait - then you must be paid for that time also

 
In the Morillion case, the farm workers were told that they had to go to the bus pick up zone at a particular time and then wait for the bus.  The California Supreme Court held that this “waiting time” must be paid for by the employer. In other words the waiting time is compensable time. Morillion v. Royal Packing Co., 22 Cal. 4th 575, 587 (2000).

Does stand-by time have to be paid for Under California wage law? You can be owed money for being hired to do nothing - getting paid for standing by

 
“Of course an employer, if he chooses, may hire a man to do nothing, or to do nothing but wait for something to happen. Refraining from other activity often is a factor of instant readiness to serve, and idleness plays a part in all employments in a stand-by capacity. Readiness to serve may be hired, quite as much as service itself, and time spent lying in wait for threats to the safety of the employer's property may be treated by the parties as a benefit to the employer.” (quoting Armour & Co. v. Wantock (1944) 323 U.S. 126, 133). Mendiola v. CPS Security Solutions, Inc., 60 Cal. 4th 833, 840 (2015).

For example, Limousine drivers must be paid for waiting for customers

For example, under California wage and hour laws - limousine drivers must be paid for the time that they are on stand-by, waiting for the next customer. Ghazaryan v. Diva Limousine, Ltd. (2008) 169 Cal.App.4th 1524, 1535.
 

Do I have to be paid if I am subject to the control of the company? What is the difference between "control" vs. "subject to control," under California wage law? 

All you need to be able to show is that you are subject to the control of the employer - even if you aren’t working or actually being controlled. You still must be paid for the time - even if your employer is not actually controlling you. All you have to show is that you are subject to control.  Even if you aren’t working and are doing non-work activities.  Sali v. Corona Reg'l Med. Ctr., 909 F.3d 996, 1010 (2018).


Time is compensable if an employee "is suffered or permitted to work, whether or not required to do so."

 
Second, time is compensable if an employee "is suffered or permitted to work, whether or not required to do so." Morillion v. Royal Packing Co., 22 Cal. 4th 575, 587 (2000). (citing California Wage Order 4 Section 2(G)).
 
This is a another way of saying that if you’re working, then you must be paid for the time that you’re working. This may include "time an employee is working but is not subject to an employer's control," such as "unauthorized overtime, which the employer has not requested or required."  Sali v. Corona Reg'l Med. Ctr., 909 F.3d 996, 1010 (2018).
 

Your employer must pay for your unauthorized overtime

 
The time that you must be paid for can include work such as unauthorized overtime, which the employer has not requested or required. "Work not requested but suffered or permitted is work time. For example, if you voluntarily continue to work at the end of the shift.  Morillion v. Royal Packing Co., 22 Cal. 4th 575, 585 (2000). (Citing Wage Order 14 Section 2(G)).
 
It is the duty of management to exercise its control and see that the work is not performed if it does not want it to be performed. If your employer knows or should know that you’re working, then you must be paid for this time. Morillion v. Royal Packing Co., 22 Cal. 4th 575, 585 (2000).
 

What does "suffered or permitted to work mean" under the California Wage Orders?

 
Thus, the words “suffer or permit” means with knowledge of your employer. Morillion v. Royal Packing Co., 22 Cal. 4th 575, 585 (2000).
 
For example, an employee may voluntarily continue to work at the end of the shift. . . . The employer knows or has reason to believe that he is   continuing to work and the time is working time. Sali v. Corona Reg'l Med. Ctr., 909 F.3d 996, 1009-1010 (2018).
 
In all such cases it is the duty of the management to exercise its control and see that the work is not performed if it does not want it to be performed. Sali v. Corona Reg'l Med. Ctr., 909 F.3d 996, 1009-1010 (2018).
 

Under the Troester case - does the employer has the burden of “tracking of small amounts of regularly occurring worktime?”


The California Supreme Court in Troester, expressly "decline[d] to adopt a rule that would require the employee to bear the entire burden of any difficulty in recording regularly occurring work time." Troester v. Starbucks Corp., 5 Cal. 5th 829, 848 (2018).

To the contrary, Troester held that "employers are in a better position than employees to devise alternatives that would permit the tracking of small amounts of regularly occurring work time." Troester v. Starbucks Corp., 5 Cal. 5th 829, 848 (2018).  And Troester explained that "even when neither a restructuring of work nor a technological fix is practical, it may be possible to reasonably estimate work time . . . and to compensate employees for that time." Troester v. Starbucks Corp., 5 Cal. 5th 829, 848 (2018).


Employers are responsible for paying for all time worked, even if it’s only 59 second (or less)

In the Nike case, the employer (Nike) required employees to undergo exit inspections anytime the employees left the store at the end of their shift or for a break. The mandatory checks varied in length depending on the circumstances, but they always occurred while the employee was clocked out, and the time was uncompensated. Sometimes the mandatory checks lasted for only seconds. Rodriguez v. Nike Retail Servs., 928 F.3d 810, 817 (2019).
 
Under these facts, the Ninth Circuit held that Nike must compensate the employees for this regular work time. Rodriguez v. Nike Retail Servs., 928 F.3d 810, 817 (2019).

 

"But it's only a couple of minutes a shift - it's not worth it..." - -  NOT!!! It can be TOTALLY worth it!!!

If you're only talking a few minutes a day, then you might think bringing a wage claim, just isn't worth. Which may be true for you if you're only talking about the wages. But California law realizes that many people won't enforce their wage rights for a few dollars. However, under California's strict wage laws you're also entitled to liquidated damages, pay stub violations, waiting time penalties and PAGA penalties. 

Suppose you're owed $17 in wages. Depending on how much you make an hour, you may be entitled to $8,000 or more in penalties. That's right. You should keep on reading... 

Need help right now?


 Call us at 619-304-1000  - If you call after regular business hours, when you leave a message, be sure to repeat your name and telephone number twice, so we get it correctly. And be sure to indicate whether it's okay if we respond by text.
 
Text us at 858-281-8008 - Be sure and put "new wage case" in your text.
 
Or leave us a message on this webpage.

 

What are liquidated damages for wages?....  You're also owed liquidated damages  

Since you weren't paid at least minimum wage for the this time, you're also owed liquidated damagesCalifornia Labor Code Section 1194.2 (a).

Under California law, if you're not paid at least minimum wage for any time that you work, you're also entitled to liquidated damages. Which is double the minimum wage. 

Thus, for every hour that your not paid, you owed double the current minimum wage. For example, if the minimum wage is $12 an hour, then you're entitled to $24 an hour. 

The pay that you're owed for not getting paid for opening/ closing is probably much less than penalties you're owed under California wage laws 

The pay you're owed for not getting paid for all of the time that you worked is probably much less than the penalties that you're owed under California's strict  wage laws. In addition to the pay you're owed, you're also owed pay stub violations and waiting time penalties. 

You're also owed paycheck stub violations (up to $4,000) 

You're also owed paycheck stub violations

Since your employer didn't put all of the hours you worked on your pay stub, didn't put your gross pay and didn't put the net pay owed to  you on your pay stub, then you are entitled to paycheck stub violations. California Labor Code Section 226(a).

These 226 penalties are up to $4,000. 

You're also owed waiting time penalties

Since all of your wages weren't paid timely at time of termination, you're also owed waiting time penalties.  California Labor Code Section 203. The waiting penalties you're owed are up to 30 days pay. 

For example, if  you made $15 an hour your waiting time penalties are as follows: 

$15 x 8 hours = $120 

$120 x 30 days = $3,600 

You're also entitled to PAGA money penalties for California Labor Code violations  

Under the Private Attorneys General Act your entitled to the following PAGA violations/ penalties: 

California Labor Code Section 1197 violation (minimum wage)
California Labor Code Section 1197.1 penalties for payment of less than minimum wage.
California Labor Code Section   510 - overtime (for the shifts over 8 hours)
California Labor Code Section  224b - not paying wages earned every pay period 
 
 

PAGA Wage order violations

3(A)(1) - Daily Overtime
4(A) minimum wage
4(B) payroll period - pay minimum wage
 

How do PAGA penalties work?

Under PAGA, the civil penalty against the employer, for an initial violation is $100 per employee per pay period, and the penalty for each subsequent violation is $200 per employee per pay period.
 
Should I be getting paid if it take a few minutes to open the store/ business before I clock in to get paid? 
 
Yes.
 
If you have to do anything/ perform any duties (unlock door, turn off alarm, whatever) - before you start getting paid - then you are owed wages for this time. Even if it is a little as two minutes. Under California law, you must be paid for all regular work duties. Troester v. Starbucks Corp., 5 Cal. 5th 829, 847 (2018).

Am I supposed to be paid for opening the business before I clock in? 

Yes. 

California wage law: Preliminary duties - opening the business

There are occasional instances where an employer will require a worker to be on the premises early in order to unlock doors, sign for a delivery, or meet a visitor. If you arrive earlier than your usual shift to “open up,” make coffee, answer emails, take calls, schedule appointments, or anything else for your employer, your paid time begins when you begin work—regardless of when others arrive.

Under California law, you must be paid for all regular work duties. Troester v. Starbucks Corp., 5 Cal. 5th 829, 847 (2018).

This includes, unlocking doors, turning off alarms, turning on lights, and/or logging onto a computer. If you perform any of these tasks before you clock in, then the company must compensate you for this time. Even if it is a short amount of time. 

Am I supposed to be paid for the time it takes to close the store/ business after I have clocked out? opening the business before I clock in? 

Should I be getting paid for the time it takes to close the business after I have clocked out? 

Yes.

California law requires that workers  get paid for time after they clock out and they are closing the business. Such as turning on alarms, locking the door, etc. 

Under California law, you must be paid for all regular work duties. Troester v. Starbucks Corp., 5 Cal. 5th 829, 847 (2018). Even when this take only a minute or two to perform. 

 

Am I supposed be paid for the time it takes for a shift overlap? Shift overlap law in California. 

Yes. 

If you have to report to work in order to take over the next shift (such as nurses, factory workers, etc.); then you must be getting paid for this time. 

Under California law, you must be paid for all time that you are under the control of the employer. Sali v. Corona Reg'l Med. Ctr., 909 F.3d 996, 1009-10 (9th Cir. 2018). This includes time spent during shift overlaps. 

 

 

If I have to go through a security check or bag check at work - should I be getting paid for that time? - getting paid for all the time that you work

If you have to go through a security line or bag check either going into work, or leaving work - under California law, you must be paid to this time. 

Here is a good article that explains why you must be paid for the time spent in security checks, security lines and bag checks.

 

Getting paid for the time it takes for me to put on and take off my work gear (safety gear, uniform, bunny suit, Tyvek coveralls, etc.)

Under California law, you're supposed to be paid for the time it takes to put on and take off your work gear, uniform, safety equipment. This is called donning and doffing law. Here is an article on California donning and doffing laws

 

Need help right now?


 Call us at 619-304-1000  - If you call after regular business hours, when you leave a message, be sure to repeat your name and telephone number twice, so we get it correctly. And be sure to indicate whether it's okay if we respond by text.
 
Text us at 858-281-8008 - Be sure and put "new wage case" in your text.
 
Or leave us a message on this webpage.
 
 
 
 
This article isn't legal advice
 
These discussions and/or examples are not legal advice. All legal situations are different. These testimonials, endorsements, photos and/or discussions do not constitute a guarantee, warranty, or prediction regarding the outcome of your legal matter, or your particular case/ situation. Every case is different. There are any number of reasons why class actions are not certified, not won and/or PAGA actions are not successful.
 
Just because we have gotten great results in so many other unpaid wage cases, doesn't guarantee in particular result in other cases. Including, your wage case. Every case is different.
William Turley
Connect with me
“When I seek out professional advice, I don’t want B.S., I want it straight up. I figure you do also.”
Be the first to comment!

Post a Comment

To reply to this message, enter your reply in the box labeled "Message", hit "Post Message."

Name:*

Email:* (will not be published)

Message:*

Notify me of follow-up comments via email.