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The Turley & Mara Law Firm, APLC

San Diego Longshore Act Attorney - - Cumulative Trauma Claims & the LHWCA

“When I seek out professional advice, I don’t want B.S., I want it straight up. I figure you do also.” - Longshore Lawyer - Bill Turley

Longshore Attorney LHWCA Lawyer

My Best Advice

When it comes to Longshore Act Cases, nothing is more important than telling the truth. Nothing is more important than your credibility. You need to be up front and honest about every detail about your case.

Do not exaggerate the fine print. If a judge suspects your not being truthful, then they will dismiss your case. Always be honest. Always tell the truth.

My Second Best Advice

Do your research on Longshore Act Cases and order my free book, Win Your Injury Case: The Ultimate No B.S. Guide To Avoiding Insurance Company Tricks That Ruin Your Case [even before you hire a lawyer].

It is full of helpful and useful information when it comes to your Longshore Act Case.

Need help right now?

Give our office a call at (619) 234-2833. Our team of knowledgeable staff are here to help and listen.

US L&H  Cumulative Trauma Claims

There are many traumatic injuries which regularly occur in shipyards. However, more "routine" type injuries also occur. Many of the injuries shipyard workers suffer are due to repetitive trauma or repetitive motions. From lifting, to welding, to ship fitting, to reaching to bending to stooping - - these type of injuries are disabling. Many workers "work through the pain" because they need to feed their families and can not afford to miss time from work.

Cumulative trauma injuries occur over time. For example, a chipper's hands may develop carpel-tunnel syndrome due to the repetitive movement of the chipping gun. Or a shipfitter may gradually suffer hearing loss due to exposure to load noise below decks. Cumulative back strains can cause long-term disability. These may technically be successive injuries or repetitive trauma.

If the disease or injury arises due to working in the shipyard, on the waterfront, in harbors or as Longshoreman; then it may be found to be compensable under the Longshore Act.

 

The following are examples of cumulative trauma injuries which are most likely compensable under the Longshore Act:

  • "I work overhead for hours on end and the top of my shoulder starts stinging and getting numb after 3-4 hours."

  • "I start feeling numbness in my left knee after having to climb ship board ladders all day. I have difficulty finishing the shift. I am popping over the counter pain medication to make through the work day."

  • "I injured my back for the first time when I fell into an uncovered whole in the early 90's. My back has been getting worse and worse since then. Two weeks ago I was lifting a bracket and a felt a stabbing pain in the same part of my back."

  • "I have been using a chipping gun for over 15 years. My hands have been getting numb on me for the last few years."

  • "I try and wear hearing protection, but I have to take them our sometimes just to hear the supervisor. Even with the ear plugs it is very loud in the spaces where I work. Lately I've had to turn the television up louder and louder and my wife and kids are on me about it."

  • "I have been dropping my welding torch for the last few years. My hand doesn't have the strength it used to have. It hurts to grip the torch sometimes."

  • "My back has gotten to the point that I can barely bend over. I have this tightness in my low back whenever I have to go up and down shipboard ladders with my tools."

All of the foregoing shipyard injury scenarios may be termed cumulative trauma type injuries. If you or a family member has a "sore knee," "sore back," "sore elbow" or the like; be sure to contact a good experienced Longshore Act Lawyer.

Disclaimer: Please understand these discussions and/or examples are not legal advice. All legal situations are different. This testimonial, endorsement and/or discussion does not constitute a guarantee, warranty, or prediction regarding the outcome of your legal matter, your particular case/ situation and/or this particular case/ situation. Thanks, Bill Turley

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